Racial injustice

Racial injustice, along with destruction of innocence, is represented through the characters and significant events that Scout, her family, and the neighbourhood went through. When Scout and Jem followed Calpurnia to the First Purchase Church, Lula, a strong-willed and boisterous black woman, got mad at Calpurnia for bringing white children to black church. It was the first time Scout and Jem were racially discriminated by a black person and they learned that racism can happen from both sides. Furthermore, Tom Robinson’s conviction was planned by the jury of twelve white men prior to the trial just because he was a black man accused by a white family. Even though the jury was well aware of the reasonable invalidity of Tom Robinson’s physical ability to assault and rape Mayella Ewell due to his crippled left arm, the verdict that the jury gave did not reflect their conscience but the color of Tom’s skin. The jury did not view the case from Tom Robinsons’s point of view but took account of doubtful and refutable evidence provided by Mr. Gilmer. Tom Robinson, who was shot to death, could never receive compensation in a light of justice for his conviction of a crime that he did not commit. All of these examples further illustrate that racism played a large part in the system of justice described in Lee’s novel.