Operant conditioning is a very difficult subject to talk about

Operant conditioning is a very difficult subject to talk about. I say this because of all the different angles a person can look at it (Staddon, 2016). Some extremes are an individual that believes that every single thing that they do from the moment that they wake up to the moment that they go to sleep is due to operant conditioning. Either from others or from themselves it was learned from their consequences (Staddon, 2016). The opposite extreme is an individual that believes that everything is done by choice and has nothing to do with being controlled. However, in my opinion, operant conditioning is way of learning by consequence. An action which is rewarded is more likely to be repeated, along with an action that is punished is less likely to be repeated.
For addition, behavior modification is a psychological theory of human behavior. It evolved from the application of experimentally derived principles of learning to the modification of problem behaviors. The theory is based on a psychological model of human behavior that rejects the psychoanalytic or quasi disease model of mental illness (Oram, 2016). Approaches to behavior modification assume that abnormal behavior is acquired and maintained in the same manner as normal behavior and can be changed directly through the application of social learning principles (Oram, 2016). Assessment procedures focus on describing how an individual behaves, thinks, and feels in specific situations.
For instant, if a student continually acts loud during class, even though he or she is usually well behaved and so the teacher takes away their privilege to participate in some things they may enjoy. For example, I got to eat in some classes occasionally, and so did some other students. Now, say a student acted up; maybe they’d get that privilege taken away. The acting up would go away because they lost a privilege.