Nonmaleficence The Hippocratic Oath expresses the duty of nonmaleficence together with the duty of beneficence

Nonmaleficence
The Hippocratic Oath expresses the duty of nonmaleficence together with the duty of beneficence. We dedicate the following oath to as a nurse. “I will use treatment to help the risk according to my ability and judgment, but i will never use it to injure or wrong them.”
As a nurse we have a duty to protect the patient safety.

Beneficence
The second principle, beneficence is an action that is done for the benefit of others. As a nurse we have wrong things and harassment during the patient care. Nurses are always commitment to doing good. Beneficent action can be taken to help prevent or remove harms or to improve the situation of others. We can improve beneficaly action by talking to the community about STD prevention and noncommunicable disease prevention, encouraging a patient to avoid smoking etc. we can improve beneficence by doing of active goodness, kindness or charity, including all actions intended to benefit others.

Fidelity
The Fidelity that can address the responsibility to be trustworthy and keep promises. This principle also relate to duty of reciprocity-consideration of the other point of view. In between nurses patient relationship, we have to be faithful to agreement and promises. As an example nurses make promises such as i will find out for you about your medication or i will be back with your pain relief medications etc… Nurse should to take these promises seriously, otherwise patient has not rust you. And it is not good for your professional life. We can build up fidelity by being faithful, keeping promises, always doing what is right, being trustworthy, confidential, showing respect and dignity, respecting autonomy and acting in their best interest.

Justice
The word justice is closely attached with the legal system. However this refers the decision based on fairness equitably and distribute benefits to all people. Also justice relates to equal treatment of all patient.
The health care provider must consider four main areas when evaluating justice: fair distribution of scarce resources, competing needs, rights and obligations, and potential conflicts with established legislation.